Cal EvansInterview with Jonathan Sundquist (23.9.2014, 05:00 UTC) Link
SitePoint PHPBeing a Full Stack Developer (22.9.2014, 16:00 UTC)

full stack developer

The barrier of entering the web development industry as a web developer is still low, but it’s getting increasingly complex.

The dynamic nature of the whole industry makes requirements shift often to the most popular and “next best thing” tools and programming languages.

Gone are the days when only one programming language or a very specific process was required from a developer. Nowadays programmers must know a range of technologies across multiple platforms in order to do good work.

What does a full-stack developer mean?

The term full-stack means developers who are comfortable working with both back-end and front-end technologies.

To be more specific, it means that the developer can work with databases, PHP, HTML, CSS, JavaScript and everything in between, also, venturing as far as converting Photoshop designs to front-end code.

A full-stack developer doesn’t need to master all of the areas and technologies he needs to work it, because that just makes it nearly impossible, he just needs to be comfortable working with those technologies, and that’s a lot too.

What full-stack meant in 2000 and what it means now?

full-stack

Continue reading %Being a Full Stack Developer%

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PHP ClassesPHP 5.7 New Features - Lately in PHP podcast episode 51 (22.9.2014, 09:01 UTC)
By Manuel Lemos
Now that PHP 5.6 was finally released, PHP 5.7 is already being planned as a release to happen before PHP 7.

The new features planned for PHP 5.7 was one of the main topics covered by Manuel Lemos and Arturs Sosins in the episode 51 of the Lately in PHP podcast. They also did an extensive review the new features of PHP 5.6.

Now listen to the podcast, or watch the hangout video, or read the transcript to learn more about these PHP release features.
Link
SitePoint PHPWhat to Expect from Yii 2.0 (20.9.2014, 16:00 UTC)

Yii 2.0 was released into beta last April and the goal for a first stable release was set for the middle of 2014. The GitHub issue list has 300 open issues and 2913 closed while I’m writing this and both numbers are still increasing. The progress to the 2.0RC milestone was at 99%. My guess is that the team is close, but we’ll probably have to wait just a little bit longer. While we’re all waiting, lets take a look at what we can expect by looking at an already available example.

A tiny bit of history

The first version of Yii became popular quite fast after it was released in 2008. It’s founder, Qiang Xue, previously worked on the Prado framework and used experience and feedback from that to build Yii.

Yii uses many ideas from other frameworks, languages and libraries: Prado, Ruby, jQuery, Symfony and Joomla are all acknowledged as sources of inspiration.

The first commits for Yii 2.0 date back to 2011 but the development picked up last year. The team did a rewrite with an aim to become the state of the art new generation PHP framework. It adopts the latest technologies and features, such as Composer, PSR, namespaces, traits, and more.

Something worth mentioning is that according to the download page Yii version 1.1 support will end on December 31, 2015, so we do get some time to start thinking about making the transition.

Requirements

Continue reading %What to Expect from Yii 2.0%

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Thomas WeinertFluentDOM 5.1 - New Features (20.9.2014, 13:18 UTC)
FluentDOM 5.1 is now available. Here are some of the highlights:

Functors 

The classes can now be called as functions to navigate in a DOM with XPath expressions. The following example fetches all link hrefs attributes from an HTML page:
$dom = new \FluentDOM\Document();
$dom->loadHTMLFile('http://fluentdom.org/');

$links = [];
foreach ($dom('//a[@href]/@href') as $href) {
  $links[] = (string)$href;
}


This works for most of the nodes in a DOM. 

Creator

The new Creator class provides short syntax to create DOM nodes. More detailed information can be found in the wiki.
$_ = FluentDOM::create();
echo $_(
  'ul',
  ['class' => 'navigation'],
  $_('li', 'FluentDOM')
);

XML To JSON

Several serializers/loaders for JSON where added. JSONML, Rayfish, BadgerFish and RabbitFish are supported.
echo "XML -> JsonML\n\n";
$json = json_encode(
  new FluentDOM\Serializer\Json\JsonML($dom), 
  JSON_PRETTY_PRINT);
echo $json;

echo "\n\nJsonML -> XML\n\n";
echo FluentDOM(
  $json, 'application/jsonml+json')->formatOutput();

The Release

Link
SitePoint PHPHow to Deploy Symfony Apps with Capifony (19.9.2014, 16:00 UTC)

Say you have a Symfony application. At some point, you would like to deploy it to your server and show it to the world. Of course, you can do it all manually, but these days you can also choose to use a tool like Capifony.

If you have developed Ruby applications in the past, you are perhaps familiar with Capistrano. Capistrano is a tool to deploy your Ruby application to your server. Capifony has been created on top op Capistrano is basically a collection of deployment recipes.

In this article, we are going to deploy a Symfony application to a server with Capifony.

How does Capifony work?

Before we start, it’s important to understand how Capifony works. By running the deploy command, Capifony runs certain commands performing different tasks. For example, it will download composer, install the dependencies and clear the cache.

The directory structure is very important. Capifony needs two directories and one symlink. The first directory it needs is called releases. Every time you deploy, a new directory is created within this directory. Capifony pulls in your git repository and runs all commands on this newly created directory.

The second directory is named shared. You can imagine that some directories are shared between releases. For instance, if you allow people to upload images, you want to make sure that these files are shared between releases. These directories and files are typically stored in the shared directory.

Next to these two directories, we have a symlink called current. This symlink points to the latest successful release. So, when you deploy a new version, a new directory will be created within the releases directory. If all tasks succeed on this directory, the current symlink will point to this new version.
You should point your web server to read from this symlink so it always uses the correct, latest version.

Continue reading %How to Deploy Symfony Apps with Capifony%

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SitePoint PHPPhpStorm 8 Released – See What’s New and Grab a Free License (19.9.2014, 16:00 UTC)

This week marks the release of PhpStorm 8. It’s no secret PhpStorm has been a long personal favorite of mine after having won me over from Zend Studio, Netbeans and Sublime Text, and we’ve covered the tool extensively before, most notably with the shortcuts guide by yours truly. By following the EAPs, we also taken a look at the new features in PhpStorm 8 before it even came out. Now that the day has finally come, let’s see what else is included, and finish up with a giveaway of free licenses.

Continue reading %PhpStorm 8 Released – See What’s New and Grab a Free License%

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Nomad PHPDecember 2014 – US (19.9.2014, 00:01 UTC)

Tuning Nginx and PHP-FPM... The Right Way.

Presented By
Evan Coury
December 18, 2014 20:00 CST

The post December 2014 – US appeared first on Nomad PHP.

Link
Nomad PHPDecember 2014 – EU (19.9.2014, 00:01 UTC)

Practical Message Queueing Using RabbitMQ

Presented By
James Titcumb
December 18, 2014 20:00 CET

The post December 2014 – EU appeared first on Nomad PHP.

Link
SitePoint PHPArdent: Laravel Models on Steroids (18.9.2014, 16:00 UTC)

One of the (few) things I don’t like about Laravel is that you cannot move the validation code from your controller to your models easily. When I write software I like to apply the “fat models, skinny controllers” principle. So, for me, writing the validation code in the controller is not a good thing.

To solve this, I’d like to introduce Ardent, a great package for Laravel 4. To be more precise, Ardent presents itself as “Self-validating smart models for Laravel Framework 4’s Eloquent ORM.” In other words: exactly what we need!

As you can imagine, it’s an extension of the Eloquent Model class, basically. This package comes with some new functionality, utilities and methods dedicated to input validation and other little things.

Our Test Application

For a better understanding of the advantages you can enjoy while using Ardent, we will set up a little test application. Nothing complicated: a simple To-Do List app.

Of course, I’m not going to implement a complete application: I just want to explain some principles, so I will make some controllers and models - no views. After that, I will “translate” the code using Ardent.

Our To-Do List will count two different entities:

  • User

    • id
    • first_name
    • last_name
    • email
    • password
  • Task

    • id
    • name
    • status (done / not done)

A really basic project. However, if you don’t want to write code, don’t worry: I have already prepared a migration that you can use to generate the database. Use it!

Continue reading %Ardent: Laravel Models on Steroids%

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